NBA

7 Numbers That Prove The 2017 NBA Playoffs Were The Worst Ever

The 2017 NBA Playoffs were historically lackluster, from a series of predictable first-round matchups to the Warriors taking the Finals in a completely drama-free five games. Here are the numbers that prove it…

— 79 —

79 = the total number of games in this year’s playoffs, the fewest in league history. Where’s David Stern when you need him to go back in time and thwart Kevin Durant signing with Golden State?




— 7 —

7 = the smallest margin of victory for the Cavs in Cleveland’s second-round sweep of the Raptors. Numerous pundits (i.e. Bill Simmons) thought Toronto could give LeBron and Co. a run for their money, but the Cavaliers turned Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan into a Swiffer WetJet and mopped the floor with them…




— 102 —

102 = the fewest points the Warriors have scored in a game this postseason. Utah slowed down the pace as much as they could, taunted Kevin Durant with mildly offensive comments (they’re really polite in Salt Lake City), and Golden State still broke 100 in its 102-91 Game 4 victory over the Jazz. We’re not poo-pooing the Warriors incredible skill, but the talent chasm between the Dubs and the rest of basketball made these games less exciting than a brunch at Mitt Romney’s house. Overall (obvious point forthcoming!) the lack of parity in the NBA is an enormous problem…




— -28 —

-28 = James Harden’s +/- in Game 6 against the Spurs. Harden went 2-11 in 37 minutes with six turnovers in a game where he looked hungover (and probably was hungover). The Rockets-Spurs series had a chance to be the playoffs’ most interesting, but Harden’s Houdini-esque disappearing act turned the Western Conference Semis into the Western Conference Flaccids…




— 14 —

14 = Andre Roberson’s free throw percentage (3-21) in Oklahoma City’s opening round loss to the Rockets. This one’s kind of a stretch, but Roberson’s pathetic performance from the stripe epitomizes this year’s woeful playoffs…




— 13.5 —

13.5 = the average margin of victory in the 2017 playoffs, the second highest all-time. There were actually more blowouts (and a higher margin of victory) in 2016, but the epic 2016 NBA Finals made up for last year’s inadequacies. Not the case this year…




— 4 —

4 = the number of superstars on one NBA team. A little redundant on our end (but our metrics say you’re more prone to click on a list of seven things than a list of six things), but the Warriors budding dynasty has made the NBA so much less interesting. It makes us long for the days of David Stern — he would have definitely found a way to prohibit Durant from signing with the Warriors…

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